ANNUAL SACRED LIBATION CEREMONY FOR OUR SISTERS: The community remembers Black women lynched


ANNUAL SACRED LIBATION CEREMONY FOR OUR SISTERS

The community remembers Black women lynched

Spiritually-conscious women and men of African descent will gather 3:00PM sharp, Sunday, March 29, rain or shine, at Congo (Washington) Square, 7th & Walnut Streets in Philadelphia for the Second Annual Sacred Libation Ceremony in remembrance of the 150 documented Black women who were lynched between 1870 and 1957.

2015 SACRED LIBATION CEREMONY FLYER 3

Flyer for the 2015 Sacred Libation Ceremony to be conducted at 7th & Walnut Streets in Congo (Washington) Square Philadelphia, Pa.

In March 2014, the first annual Sacred Libation Ceremony for the women was conducted by Iya Marilyn Kai Jewett and a group of priests of Philadelphia’s African American Yoruba/Orisha community. Although it rained that day, approximately 30 people came to witness the ritual – some from as far as New York and Washington DC. The ceremony has now been instituted as an annual ritual on the last Sunday in March as part of Women’s History Month.

In addition to libation being poured by Jewett in the Yoruba tradition, women from other traditions also will participate. The Queen Mothers of the Philadelphia Asante NationNana Afua Afriyie Kyeiwaa, Philadelphiahemaa and Nana Akua Oforiwaa Amanfo, Philadelphia Asonahemaa, will pour libation in the Akan tradition from Ghana. They will be accompanied by the women of the Philadelphia Asante Abusuafoo. Other holy women participating includes well-known healer/education activist Mama Gail Clouden and her godchildren.

How did this all come about? Last year, while perusing stories on Dr. Boyce Watkins’ “Your Black World” news website, Jewett came across a story entitled, “Black women were lynched too!” written by blogger Yolanda Spivey. Although she was a student of history and knew about the list of 5,000 documented lynchings of people of African descent in the U.S., Jewett wasn’t aware of the number of women who were included. Neither was Spivey.

I can’t begin to tell how shocked I was to learn the depths of what happened to lynched Black men and women in this country,” said Spivey.  “I wasn’t naïve about the lynchings, but I was definitely naïve to learn the circumstances surrounding their murders.  The Black women in some cases were pregnant — and that didn’t matter to the white people who murdered them.  They were, in all circumstances, murdered for the silliest infractions or implicated in crimes that they did not commit.” 

Spivey’s story (http://naturallymoi.com/2014/02/yolanda-spivey-lets-not-forget-that-black-women-were-lynched-too/) led Jewett to a website owned by Brother Nnamdi Azikiwe, that’s dedicated to Henrietta Vinton Davis, a prominent leader in Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). The website (https://henriettavintondavis.wordpress.com/2009/07/22/recorded/) provides documented information on these women – their names, dates, places, why and with whom they were lynched. After reading details of the lynchings, the Egun (ancestors) began speaking to Jewett and instructed her that she must do more than send an email informing people about the history.

Amy Jacques Garvey, Henrietta Vinton Davis and Marcus Garvey

Amy Jacques Garvey, Henrietta Vinton Davis and Marcus Garvey

They needed libation poured for them to uplift and bring light their souls,” Jewett explained. They wanted to be remembered and have their stories told. They wouldn’t let me rest. It was physically and spiritually painful. I couldn’t sleep for the two weeks leading up to the ritual. I kept asking them why me? They replied that it was part of my destiny and that I had to do it.”

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The way to right wrongs is to turn the light of truth on them.


 

The way to right wrongs is to turn the light of truth on them.

The way to right wrongs is to turn the light of truth on them. This is an advertisement taken from the Washington Bee newspaper dated Saturday October 22, 1892. It is an advertisement for Ida B. Wells’ lecture held at Metropolitan AME Church in Washington, D.C. Her subject that night was “Southern Mob Rule.” She was introduced by Timothy Thomas Fortune, editor of the New York Age and later an editor of the Negro World Newspaper. Presiding at the event was Mary Church Terrell.

Ida B. Wells gives us our marching orders. We know 148 women of African ancestry were lynched in the United States of America. We will right those wrongs by turning the light of truth on them.

Livication Marker Unveiling 2013


PRESS RELEASE

07/10/2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information:
Vaunita Goodman (202) 291-1663
email: shero1860@facebook.com
blog
: https://henriettavintondavis.wordpress.com
#Livication

JULY 20, 2013 is HENRIETTA VINTON DAVIS GRAVE MARKER UNVEILING

-Events to recognize cultural icon-

Washington, DC –Today the Henrietta Vinton Davis Memorial Foundation (HVDMF) announced plans to unveil a marker at the grave of its namesake in National Harmony Memorial Park. The Foundation has as its mission to raise awareness of the life and legacy of Shakespearean actor, elocutionist, dramatic reader and activist Henrietta Vinton Davis.

Miss Davis remained relatively unrecognized until July 1983 when an article entitled “Henrietta Vinton Davis and the Garvey Movement” by Professor William Seraile was published in the journal ‘Afro-Americans in New York Life and History’. Nearly a year later, acknowledgment of her contributions increased with the publication of the book ‘Shakespeare in Sable’ written by Professor Errol Hill of Dartmouth University. Her home in Northeast Washington, DC has been listed on Cultural Tourism DC’s African American Heritage Trail since 1999.

On Saturday July 20, 2013 the HVDMF starts the day off with an award presentation and celebration at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library, culminating with the unveiling of a marker at Miss Davis’ grave site at National Harmony Memorial Park. Guest speakers and celebrants include:

Dr. William Seraile (Bruce Grit), Barbara Eklof (For Every Season), Kevin Grace (Friends of Joe Gans), Nnamdi Azikiwe (Vinton Davis Weblog) and Mwariama Kamau (UNIA). Producing partners for the occasion are Vaunita Goodman (MTPC) and Michon Boston (Iola’s Letter). Clayton LeBouef (Something The Lord Made, The Wire, Homicide) will serve as Master of Ceremonies.

In 2008, DC Mayor Adrian Fenty issued a proclamation designating August 25 ‘Henrietta Vinton Davis Day.’ The decree acknowledged Davis as the first African American to work at the DC Recorder of Deeds office beginning in 1878, before Frederick Douglass was appointed Recorder. She made her career debut as a Shakespearean actor, elocutionist and dramatic reader in Washington, DC on April 25, 1883 where she was introduced by Douglass, a family friend. The proclamation acknowledges the success of Miss Davis as a public speaker and cultural icon.

Celebration / Award Presentation recognizing Vera J. Katz, (Professor Emerita Howard University Theatre Arts) and others will be conducted in the A-5 Auditorium 11am-1:30-pm at the Martin Luther King, Jr Memorial Library 901 G Street, NW, Washington, D.C. (202)  727-0321

Livication / Henrietta Vinton Davis Marker Unveiling will be conducted 3pm-5pm at her grave site in National Harmony Memorial Park 7101 Sheriff Road Largo, MD (301) 772-0900

Events are free and open to the public.

About Henrietta Vinton Davis
For thirty-five years after her debut performing “Shakespearean delineations”, original plays and dramatic readings with her own performing company, and local troupes throughout the United States, South America and the Caribbean, Henrietta Vinton Davis broke new ground as a successful theatrical artisan. Her commitment to her craft gained her recognition as the first African American “woman of the stage.”

During 1919, a year notable for its “Red Summer,” she joined the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League headed by Marcus Garvey.

As a leader of the African Redemption Movement, Davis made use of her acting skills to promote the aims and objectives of the UNIA. Her ability to “transport her listeners” to another place with her oratorical skills played a key role in both attracting members to the organization and promoting the Black Star Line Shipping Company. As such, she was elected to numerous positions including International Organizer, and Third Assistant President General of the UNIA. Additionally, as Vice President and a Director of the Black Star Line, Davis was the de facto authority aboard the Black Star Line’s flagship vessel, the S.S. Yarmouth, on its maiden voyage. The ship was laden with a cargo worth upwards of $5.000.000 destined for the Caribbean. On the ship’s return Marcus Garvey proclaimed Miss Davis “the greatest woman of the [African] race today” in a meeting at the UNIA’s Liberty Hall.

About The Henrietta Vinton Davis Memorial Foundation
Initially organized to raise funds for a marker at the grave of Lady Henrietta Vinton Davis

in 2005, the mission of The Henrietta Vinton Davis Memorial Foundation has evolved to include publishing books, producing plays, films/videos and conducting symposiums educating the general public about her life and the times in which she lived.

* *

A scene from the play Christophe by William Edgar Easton

Proclamation for Henrietta Vinton Davis Day

Cultural Tourism DC immortalizes Henrietta Vinton Davis with a plaque on her former residence


Cultural Tourism DC announced that it will unveil a plaque at the former residence of the Honorable Lady Henrietta Vinton Davis on May 8, 2010 at 2pm.

Miss Davis’ residence has been a part of Cultural Tourism DC’s African American Heritage Trail for nearly a decade. The recognition comes on the heels of a “Livication” program honoring Miss Davis at Washington, DC’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library held on Sunday March 14, 2010. The program was a collaborative effort between the Henrietta Vinton Davis Memorial Foundation and the Martin Luther King, Jr, Memorial Library. The event was the kickoff for an exhibit recognizing Miss Davis’ significance as an elocutionist, dramatic reader and Shakespearean actor.

Her career marked a turning point in the history of Africans in America. She earned a living as a performing artist at a time when there were few with the training and skills to perform with her.

It is significant to note her home is walking distance to the newly christened Atlas Performing Arts Centre on H street. Additionally, the African Continuum Theatre is resident of the Atlas.

Women’s History Month exhibit honors Lady Henrietta Vinton Davis


Below are a few photos of the exhibit reviewing the life of Lady Henrietta Vinton Davis at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, DC.

Henrietta Vinton Davis Day Proclaimed in Baltimore


Designating August 25, 2009 "He"nrietta Vinton Davis Day in Baltimore

Designating August 25, 2009 “Henrietta Vinton Davis Day” in Baltimore

Mayor Sheila Dixon has proclaimed August 25, 2009 as “Henrietta Vinton Davis Day” in Baltimore.

Recorded Cases of Black Female Lynching Victims 1886-1957: More on Black Women Who Were Lynched


Click here for details about the March 26, 2017 Fourth Annual Sacred Libation Ceremony In Remembrance of Our Sisters

The lynching of Laura Nelson

After seeing the connection between Henrietta Vinton Davis and Black Women who were lynched (they lacked markers on their graves) we posted Dr. Daniel Meaders’ pamphlet on Black Women Who Were Lynched in America.  Reading that aroused wonder.   Were more women lynched than Dr. Meaders found? Further inquiry led us to the revelation of  “STRANGER FRUIT”: THE LYNCHING OF BLACK WOMEN THE CASES OF ROSA RICHARDSON AND MARIE SCOTT” by MARIA DELONGORIA. The information below is extracted from Appendix A: Recorded Cases of Black Female Lynching Victims 1886-1957. This list indicates approximately one hundred and fifty women who were lynched.  Four of them were known to have been pregnant at the time. m= mother d=daughter s=son f=father c=cousin w=wife h=husband #=age of victim b=brother s1=sister * some sexually related aspect (evidence of rape, sexual assault and/or ‘relationship’) ** approximate date

Number Date Name Lynched with County/City State
 1870    

1

SeptMrs. John Simes Henry Co KYRepublican
 1872 

2

NovMrs. Hawkins (m) Fayette Co KYRepublican

3

 —– Hawkins (d) Fayette Co KYRepublican
 1876    

4

MayMrs. Ben French Warsaw KYmurder
 1878    

5

4 NovMaria Smith Hernando MSmurder
 1880    

6

29 JulyMilly Thompson Clayton GA 

7

6 DecJulia Brandt (15)Joe Barnes, Vance BrandtCharleston SCtheft/murder
 1881    

8

*4 SeptAnn (Eliza) Cowan (35) Newberry SCarson
 1885     

9

29 SeptHarriet FinchJerry Finch, John Pattishal, Lee TysonChatham Co NCmurder
 1886    

10

25 JulyMary Hollenbeck Tattnall GAmurder

11

18 AugEliza Wood Madison TNmurder

12

SeptCummins (d)Stephen Cummins (f)Pulaski KY 
 1887    

13

28 AprilGracy Blanton W. Carroll LAtheft
 1891    

14

15 AprilRoxie Elliott Centerville AL 

15

9 MayMrs. Lee Lowndes MSson accused of murder

16

1 AugEliza Lowe Henry ALarson

17

 Ella Williams Henry ALarson

18

28 SeptLouise StevensonGrant WhiteHollandale MSmurder
 1892    

19

3 FebMrs. Martin Sumner Co TNson accused of arson

20

10 FebMrs. Brisco(w) ARrace prejudice

21

10 FebJessie Dillingham Smokeyville TXtrain wrecking

22

11 MarchElla (15) Rayville LAattempted murder/poisoning

23

2 NovMrs. Hastings(m)son (16)Jonesville LAhusband accused

24

 Hastings(d,14) Jonesville LAfather accused of murder

25

21 DecCora Guthrie,Indian Territory 
 1893    

26

19 MarchJessie Jones Jellico TNmurder

27

18 JulyMeredith Lewis Roseland LAmurder

28

15 SeptEmma FairPaul Hill, Paul Archer, William ArcherCarrolton ALarson

29

16 SeptLouisa Carter (Lou)(m) Jackson MSpoisoning a well

30

 Mahala Jackson (d) Jackson MSpoisoning a well
 1893    

31

NovMrs. Phil Evens (m) Bardstown KY 

32

 Evans (d) Bardstown KY 

33

 Evans (d) Bardstown KY 

34

4 NovMary (Eliza) Motlow Lynchburg VAarson

35

9 NovRilla Weaver Clarendon AR 
 1894    

36

6 Marchunknown Negro woman Pulaski AR 

37

16 JulyMarion Howard Scottsville KY 

38

24 JulyNegro woman Simpson Co MSrace prejudice
 1895    

39

20 MarchHarriet Tally Petersburg TNarson

40

21 AprilMary Deane Greenville ALmurder

41

 Alice Green Greenville ALmurder

42

 Martha Green Greenville ALmurder

43

1 JulyMollie Smith Trigg County KY 

44

20 JulyMrs. Abe Phillips (m)unnamed child (1)Hannah Phillips (d)Mant TX 

45

23 JulyNegro woman Brenham TX 

46

2 AugMrs. James Mason (w)James Mason (h)Dangerfield TX 

47

*28 AugNegro woman Simpson MSmiscegenation

48

26 SeptFelicia Francis New Orleans LA 

49

11 OctCatherine Matthews Baton Rouge LApoisoning

50

2 DecHannah Kearse(Walker,m),Isom K. (s)Colleton SCstealing a bible
 1896     

51

*12 JanCharlotte Morris Jefferson LAmiscegenation/living with white “husband”

52

1 AugIsadora Morely Selma ALmurder

53

18 NovMimm Collier Steenston MS 
 1897    

54

9 FebNegro woman Carrolton MStheft/arson

55

5 MarchOtea Smith Julietta FLmurder

56

12 MayAmanda Franks Jefferson ALmurder

57

 Molly White Jefferson ALmurder
 1898    

58

22 FebDora Baker(d,2)Frazier Baker(f)Williamsburg SCrace prejudice

59

9 NovRose Etheridge Phoenix SCmurder

60

13 NovEliza Goode Greenwood SCmurder
 1899    

61

23 MarchWillia Boyd Silver City MS 
 1900    

62

2 MarchMrs. Jim Cross (m) Lowndes AL 

63

 Cross (d) Lowndes AL 

64

7 JulyLizzie Pool Hickory Plains ARrace prejudice

65

25 JulyAnna Mabry New Orleans LArace prejudice

66

28 AugNegro womanNegro manForrest City NCtheft of peaches
 1901    

67

5 MarchBallie Crutchfield Rome TNtheft

68

20 MarchTerry Bell Terry MS 

69

1 AugBetsey McCray (m)Belfiield (s)Carrolton MSknowledge of murder

70

 Ida McCray (d) Carrolton MSknowledge of murder

71

4 OctNegro woman Marshall TXassault
 1902    

72

15 FebBell Duly Fulton KY 

73

27 DecMrs.Emma WidemanOliver WidemanTroy SCmurder
 1903    

74

 Negro woman  murder of Mrs. Frank Matthews

75

8 JuneNegro womanNegro men (4)Smith County MSmurder

76

24 JuneLamb Whittle Concordia LA 

77

*25 JulyJennie Steers Beard Plantation, Shreveport LAmurder by poison

78

28 OctJennie McCall Hamilton FLby mistake
 1904    

79

7 FebHolbert (w)Luther HolbertDoddsville MSburning barn

80

*14 JuneMarie Thompson Lebanon Junction KYmurder

81

30 Augustunknown Bates Union AR 
 1906    

82

7 NovMeta Hicks Mitchell GAhusband accused of murder
 1907    

83

20 MarchNegro woman Stamps AR 

84

 Negro woman Stamps AR 

85

21 MayMrs. Padgett (m)SonTattnall GAson accused of rape

86

 Padgett (d) Tattnall GAbrother accused of rape
 1908    

87

3 OctMrs. D. Walker (m) Fulton KYrace hatred

88

 Walker (d) Fulton KYrace hatred
 1909    

89

9 FebRobby Baskin Houston MSmurder

90

30 JulyEmile Antione Grand Prairie LAassault
 1910     

91

April 5Laura Mitchell Lonoke ARmurder

92

*25 AugLaura Porter Monroe LAdisreputable house
 1911    

93

*25 MayLaura NelsonL.D. (14)(s)Okemah OKmurder

94

2 SeptHattie BowmanEd ChristianGreenville FLtheft
 1912    

95

**Pettigrew (d)Ben Pettigrew (f)Savannah TN 

96

**Pettigrew (d) Savannah TN 

97

 Negro woman Codele GA 

98

*23 JanBelle HathawayJohn Moore,Eugene Hamming,Dusty Cruthfield or CrutchfieldHamilton GAtenants of murdered man

99

11 FebNegro womanNegro children (3)Beaumont TX 

100

13 FebMary JacksonGeorge SaundersMarshall TX 

101

25 JuneAnn Boston Pinehurst GAmurder
 1914    

102

13 Mar**Mrs. Joe Perry (m,w)Joe Perry (h)SonChildHenderson NC 

103

*31 MarMarie Scott (17) Muskogee OKmurder

104

28 May/June**Jennie Collins Shaw MSaiding in escape

105

17 JuneParalee Collins (m)Issac (s)West Plains MO 

106

*12 JulyRosa Richardson (27-35) Providence/Santee SCmurder

107

25 NovJane Sullivan (w)Fred Sullivan (h)Byhalia MSburning a barn
 1915     

108

15 JanEula Charles(Barber,d)Dan Barber (f)Jasper County GAparents accused of bootlegging

109

 Ella Charles(Barber,d)Jesse Barber(b)Jasper County GAparents accused of bootlegging

110

MayBriley Pescott AR 

111

17 AugHope Hull AL 

112

*8 DecCordella Stevenson Columbus MS 
 1916    

113

19 AugMary Dennis Newberry FLaiding in escape

114

 Stella Long Newberry FLaiding in escape

115

4 Oct**Mary Conley Arlington GAcomplicity in murder
 1917    

116

1 MarchEmma Hooper Hammond LAmurder
 1918    

117

17 MayMary Turner (pregnant) Brooks Co GAtaught a lesson

118

4 JuneSarah Cabinessunnamed children(2)Bessie Cabiness(d)Pete (s)Tenola Cabiness(d)Cute Cabiness (d)Huntsville TXthreatening white man

119

4 SeptMrs. James Eyer Marion GA 

120

*21 DecAlma House (pregnant)Andrew ClarkShubuta MSmurder
 1919    

121

5 Mayunknown Negro woman Holmes MSrace prejudice
 1920    

122

2 Novunknown Negro woman Ocoee FLrace prejudice

123

18 NovMinnie IvoryWillie IvoryWill PerryDouglass GAmurder
 1921    

124

9 AprilRachel Moore Rankin MSrace prejudice
 1922    

125

25 JuneMercy Hall Oklahoma City OKstrike activity
 1923    

126

5 JanSarah Carrier Rosewood FLrace prejudice

127

 Lesty Gordon Rosewood FLrace prejudice

128

29 SeptNegro woman Pickens MS 

129

31 SeptNegro woman Holmes MSrace prejudice
 1924    

130

23 JunePenny WestmorelandMarcus WestmorelandSpalding GA 

131

19 July—– Sheldon Meridian MS 

132

11 SeptSarah Williams Shreveport LA 
 1925    

133

*25 AprilAnnie Lowman (m) Aiken SCdefending her daughter
 1926    

134

25 AprilLily Cobb Birmingham AL 

135

25 MayEliza Bryant Duplin NCsuccess

136

8 OctBertha Lowman(d,s1)Demon (b)Aiken SClynched after acquitted of murder

137

11 NovSally BrownClarence (c)Houston TX 
 1928    

138

25 DecNegro woman (1) Eros LAdispute w/ whites

139

 Negro woman (2) Eros LAdispute w/whites
 1930     

140

12 FebLaura Wood Salisbury NC 

141

5 JulyViola Dial (pregnant) Narketta MSrace prejudice

142

6 JulyMrs. James Eyers (w) Markeeta MSrace prejudice

143

10 SeptHolly WhitePigg LockettScooba MS 
 1931    

144

MayMrs. Wise Frankfort VAresisting Klan
 1946    

145

*25 JulyDorothy Malcolm(w) (pregnant)Roger Malcolm (h)Monroe GAable to identify mob members

146

 Mae Dorsey (w)George Dorsey (h)Monroe GAable to identify mob members
 1956     

147

*25 MarchAngenora Spencer Hyde NCmiscegenation
 1957     

148

18 NovMrs. Frank Clay Henderson NCdispute

*Crystal Nicole Femister has a similar chart in the Appendix of her dissertation “Ladies and Lynching”: The Gendered Discourse of Mob Violence in the New South, 1880-1930. Having used overlapping sources accounts for similarities although there are differences in categories, variations of names, locations and some of the other content.